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Created by the California Legislature in 1967, the State Water Resources Control Board and its nine Regional Boards ensure the highest reasonable quality for waters of the State, while allocating those waters to achieve the optimum balance of beneficial uses.

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Who We Are

  • Water Rights – We issue permits for water rights specifying amounts, conditions and construction timetables for diversion and storage. Decisions reflect water availability, recognizing prior rights and flows needed to preserve instream uses, such as recreation and fish habitat, and whether the diversion is in the public interest.

  • Water Quality – We work to protect California water through watershed management principles. Our Watershed Management Initiative, attempts to achieve the water quality goals in all of California's watersheds by supporting the development of local solutions to local problems with the full participation of all affected parties. Along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the State and Regional Boards effectively direct state and federal funds to the highest priority local watershed solutions.

What We Do

 

The Board's team of engineering geologists, engineers and scientists work together to:
  • Provide Comprehensive protection for California's waters. This includes:
    • more than 1.6 million acres of lakes.
    • 211,000 miles of rivers and streams
    • more than 1.3 million acres of bays & estuaries
    • 1,609 miles of coastline
    • the first three miles of ocean off of our coastline
    • all ground water
  • Ensure that clean water is available for more than 30 million Californians.
  • Protect California's environment, wildlife and aquatic life.
  • Develop and enforce water quality objectives and implementation plans that will best protect the beneficial uses of the State's waters, while recognizing local differences in climate, topography, geology and hydrology.
  • Serve as the frontline for state and federal water pollution control efforts.